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DARPA’s New Brain Device Increases Learning Speed by 40%

DARPA aims to accelerate memory function for skills learning.

DARPA aims to accelerate memory function for skills learning.

April 9, 2018 | Source: Futurism, futurism.com, 26 October 2017, Dom Galeon

An international team of scientists has created a non-invasive device that stimulates the brain to improve cognitive function. In tests on macaques, it reportedly increased the monkeys' learning speed by 40 percent.


New research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) has successfully demonstrated how a non-invasive method of stimulating the brain can boost cognitive performance. Working under DARPA’s Restoring Active Memory (RAM) program, scientists from HRL Laboratories in California, McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and Soterix Medical in New York tested their brain device on macaques and observed a substantial increase in the monkeys’ ability to quickly perform certain tasks.

In their study published, which has been published in the journal Current Biology, the HRL team describes how they used non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to stimulate the prefrontal cortex in the macaques. They then prompted the animals to perform a task based on associative learning — learning associations between visual cues and a location — in order to get a reward.

The macaques that wore the tDCS brain device significantly outperformed the control group. The former needed only 12 trials to learn how to immediately get the reward, while the latter needed 21 trials, with the tDCS device accounting for the 40 percent increase in learning speed, according to the researchers.


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