Laser Pulse Creates Frequency Doubling in Amorphous Dielectric Material

Georgia Tech researchers Kyu-Tae Lee and Mohammad Taghinejad demonstrate frequency doubling on a slab of titanium dioxide using a red laser to create nonlinear effects with tiny triangles of gold. The blue beam shows the frequency-doubled light, and the green beam controls the hot-electron migration (credit:  Rob Felt, Georgia Tech).

Georgia Tech researchers Kyu-Tae Lee and Mohammad Taghinejad demonstrate frequency doubling on a slab of titanium dioxide using a red laser to create nonlinear effects with tiny triangles of gold. The blue beam shows the frequency-doubled light, and the green beam controls the hot-electron migration (credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Tech).

January 14, 2020 | Source: phys.org/news, Georgia Institute of Technology, 6 January 2020

Researchers have demonstrated a new all-optical technique for creating robust second-order nonlinear effects in materials that don't normally support them. Using a laser pulse fired at an array of gold triangles on a titanium dioxide (TiO2) slab, the researchers created excited electrons that briefly doubled the frequency of a beam from a second laser as it bounced off the amorphous TiO2 slab.

By widening the range of optical materials useful for micro- and nanoscale optoelectronic applications, the work could give optical engineers new options for creating second-order nonlinear effects, which are important in such areas as optical computers, high-speed data processors, and bioimaging safe for use in the human body.

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