Naval Air Systems Command Unveils a Breakthrough Alternative to Chromate-Based Primers for DoD Aircraft

South of Japan, Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Joseph Tuazon applies alodine to unpainted screws on an MH-60S Sea Hawk assigned to the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 12 as Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Jesse Barlow uses a scribe to remove corrosion from screws on its windshield. The Navy’s new Al-Rich primer is a metalized, chromate-free, anti-corrosion primer designed for nonhazardous use by structural mechanics in charge of corrosion prevention maintenance (credit: Mass Communication Special

South of Japan, Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Joseph Tuazon applies alodine to unpainted screws on an MH-60S Sea Hawk assigned to the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 12 as Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Jesse Barlow uses a scribe to remove corrosion from screws on its windshield. The Navy’s new Al-Rich primer is a metalized, chromate-free, anti-corrosion primer designed for nonhazardous use by structural mechanics in charge of corrosion prevention maintenance (credit: Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jamaal Liddell, U.S. Navy).

December 17, 2018 | Source: Armed with Science, science.dodlive.mil, Cynthia Greenwood, 13 April 2018

In 2009, the Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition chief John J. Young, Jr. issued a mandate requiring the military departments to find new ways to reduce their use of hexavalent chromium (also known as hex-chrome or Cr6+). Hex chrome, which became infamous in the eyes of the public after the release of the film, Erin Brockovich, is a carcinogen that is harmful to humans and the environment. DoD maintenance facilities go to painstaking lengths to reduce the level of exposure sustained by their maintenance technicians due to hex chrome.

Hex chrome offers important corrosion prevention and control qualities in organic pre-treatments and primers used to coat a variety of military aircraft. For example, most coatings and primers used on legacy fighter and cargo aircraft such as the Navy’s F/A-18 and F-14, the Air Force’s C-130, C-5, and F-16 contain hex chrome, and the Army’s H-60 Black Hawk helicopter.

Complicating the issue of finding alternatives to hex chrome is the drastic cost of corrosion faced by the U.S. military. According to a study released by the DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight Office, the DoD spent nearly $20 billion on corrective corrosion actions in fiscal year 2016. That expenditure amounts to nearly 20% of the entire DoD maintenance budget.

Moreover, corrosion experienced by Navy and Marine Corps aircraft costs approximately $3.43 billion annually and accounts for almost 28% of all maintenance costs. Corrosion-related maintenance prevents active aircraft from being ready for mission tasking for approximately 57 days each year.

The high cost of corrosion within the DoD persists despite its prolific use of carcinogenic, but best-in-class, chromate primers.

To address this shortcoming, Naval Air Wairfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) materials engineer Craig Matzdorf and chemical engineer William Nickerson, now with the Office of Naval Research, have invented their own solution to the problem. Their patented Active Aluminum-Rich (“Al-Rich”) technology is a powerful anti-corrosion chemical composition created for use in coating systems. The Al-Rich primer is a metalized, sacrificial, chromate-free, high-performance, anti-corrosion primer for use in all situations where a chromated primer is currently used.

“Al-Rich is superior to existing coatings based on the novel aluminum pigment that actively overcomes corrosion by electrochemical means,” said Matzdorf. “Current coatings rely on chemical inhibitors like chromate, which are less effective at fighting galvanic corrosion. We anticipate that the Al-Rich primer will reduce galvanic and other types of corrosion and its effect on the Navy’s cost and availability.”

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