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No Batteries Required: Energy-Harvesting Yarns Generate Electricity

From left: Dr. Carter Haines BS'11, PhD'15, Dr. Shi Hyeong Kim and Dr. Nai Li  of the Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech institute at UT Dallas are lead authors of a study that describes carbon nanotube yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted.

From left: Dr. Carter Haines BS'11, PhD'15, Dr. Shi Hyeong Kim and Dr. Nai Li of the Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech institute at UT Dallas are lead authors of a study that describes carbon nanotube yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted.

October 9, 2017 | Source: The University of Texas at Dallas, utdallas.edu, 25 Aug 2017, Amanda Siegfried

An international research team led by scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in South Korea has developed high-tech yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted.

In a study published in the Aug. 25 issue of the journal Science, researchers describe “twistron” yarns and their possible applications, such as harvesting energy from the motion of ocean waves or from temperature fluctuations. When sewn into a shirt, these yarns served as a self-powered breathing monitor.