South Korea Considering Graphite 'Blackout Bombs' to Paralyze North's Electrical Grid

BLU-114/B soft bomb, a version of the CBU-94 cluster bomb, dispenses bombletts that float down using a ballute and release carbon fiber strands that can cause damage to electrical systems.

BLU-114/B soft bomb, a version of the CBU-94 cluster bomb, dispenses bombletts that float down using a ballute and release carbon fiber strands that can cause damage to electrical systems.

October 23, 2017 | Source: The Telegraph, telegraph.co.uk, 9 October 2017, Julian Ryall

South Korea is ready to deploy graphite bombs - also known as "blackout bombs" - that will paralyze North Korea's electrical power plants in the event of war breaking out on the peninsula.

Blackout bombs were first used by the United States in Iraq in the 1990 Gulf War and work by releasing a cloud of extremely fine, chemically treated carbon filaments over electrical components. The filaments are so fine that they act like a cloud, but cause short circuits in electrical equipment.

South Korea is actively looking to increase its defensive capabilities against the North and has been keen to develop graphite bombs because they are not lethal to civilians in surrounding areas.

The weapons have been developed by South Korea's Agency for Defence Development, Yonhap news agency reported, as one element of the Kill Chain pre-emptive strike program.

"All technologies for the development of a graphite bomb led by the ADD have been secured", a military official said. "It is at the stage where we can build the bombs at any time".

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