Space Force Plan Seen as Optimistic

In this June 18, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump holds up the space policy directive that he signed during a National Space Council meeting in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (credit: Susan Walsh / AP)

In this June 18, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump holds up the space policy directive that he signed during a National Space Council meeting in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (credit: Susan Walsh / AP)

April 13, 2019 | Source: Aviation Week, aviationweek.com, Lee Hudson, 9 April 2019

The Pentagon is making optimistic assumptions, especially regarding congressional support, in its five-year plan for a U.S. Space Force (USSF), according to sources on Capitol Hill and in industry.                                                                       

The Space Force planning task force initial work plan is the first deliverable as directed by the Air Force secretary. The document was created in 30 days and Aerospace DAILY obtained a copy of the draft report.

“This Initial Work Plan does, however, represent the most detailed planning to date with respect to the establishment of the USSF and will serve as the guiding roadmap for all follow-on actions,” the document reads.

The initial work plan is a five-year effort to establish the USSF. Follow-on products will consist of a series of appendices that provide detailed action plans and critical tasks for each phase, the document says.

Key planning assumptions include Congress approving the legislative proposal the Pentagon submitted March 1 and providing appropriate funding for the initial USSF staff in fiscal 2020. The task force also plans for initial Space Force staff stand-up to be completed Oct. 1.

Meeting the plan’s deadlines seems unlikely because House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith (D-Wash.) said Congress will counter with its own Space Force plan. He said he does not anticipate the current legislative proposal will pass.